CAMOTES ISLAND, Cebu: Day 3

Day 3: October 29, 2010 Friday

We were up, out & about at exactly 8:30AM stealing last-minute pictures of the picturesque resort before rushing to our last stop Lake Danao. {CLICK HERE TO VIEW CAMOTES ISLAND: MUST SEE’S!!!}

The guy who rented us his motorbike (let’s just call him “Fred” because it’s funny) agreed to take us there because we couldn’t afford lost time anymore doing it on our own. We had to catch the boat departing for Cebu at 2PM.

One of our deepest disappointments was failing to visit the top priorities in our itinerary (which included Bukilat Cave & Busay Falls) just because we couldn’t manage our time very well. That all went away 30-45mins later though as soon as we arrived at the biggest natural lake in Visayas & Mindanao otherwise known as “The Lovers’ Lake”.

Cheesy. But totally lives up to its reputation.

The tranquil body of water surrounded by a rich variety of aquatic flora & fauna is sure to bring even the most restless of souls to rest.

We realized that we’ve never felt in complete harmony with nature for the longest time.

 

Belle: I can hear Paula Cole singing in my head right now.

Jake: Wow. How very Dawson’s Creek of you.

Belle: Fine. Welcome to Tabing Ilog.


There was so much to do in that sanctuary but dang, was it hot or what! Trying to explore the place at almost the peak of noon is wrong on so many levels.

We were dying to get on a boat & greet the 2 islets nearby but we figured it would’ve been an awfully risky choice given the circumstance we might not be able to make it back on time.

Anyway, lunch was approaching fast so Jake decided to catch some freshwater fish after we took a short walk on the 11-mile eco trail. (No, we didn’t walk the entire thing.)

Our amateur fisherman managed to catch a pair of medium-sized tilapia the oldschool way… with just worms on a nylon string! Jake, you’ve got a blossoming fishing career ahead of you.

With the help of “Fred” the driver & a lake attendant, we had a total of 4 fish caught… grilled… & served for a super awesome brunch on the lake. Why only 4? Because we thought anything over would make our stomachs explode. We thought wrong. A kaldero (pot) of rice & 4 fleshless fish later, we were still pretty hungry.

Just a heads up to everyone planning to fish on Lake Danao, there are a couple of things to keep mindful of:

  1. A fee of P150/kilo is to be charged for fish caught.
  2. If you merely want to go fishing but don’t plan on eating any of the tilapia, you are not allowed to throw back any fish you have already caught.
  3. Sunset fishing is dreamier than 12NN. And less painful. (This one’s is a filler. LOL.)

Soon after finishing brunch at 1PM & having choked momentarily after getting the bill (they charged for charcoal, grilling services & condiments), we hurried back to Consuelo Wharf & waited for just a short while before we were called in to board our boat.

Surprisingly, the entire day had been delightfully sunny in contrast to the gloom of the past 2 days. We finally saw the wide-open sky cluttered with all sorts of cloud formations… the white against the blue looking as vivid as ever.

Goodbye, Camotes! See you around, our enchanting island. We will tell great stories about you.

Farewells on board didn’t seem as sad as we thought. We had the best time laughing & recalling every detail of our trip while waiting to see Cebu again.

We finally docked in the port of Danao City by 4PM then took a trisikad to the terminal for P10/person. From there, we went back home the same way we left— by jeepney bound for Mandaue City.

We got back tired, dusty & absolutely flat out broke but despite that we smiled. We smiled a whole lot. As always, we managed to pull off one of the best retreats our bodies, minds & souls needed.

FIN!

Want a temporary break from everything but can’t go anywhere just yet? Let your imagination liberate you! Read up on WHERE THE?

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